The pleasure of working with you (the DJ)

This isn’t exactly playing “hard to get”. The delicate balance, if you can find it, is that setting up specific guidelines for working with you, can lead to increased desire on the part of prospective clients to hire your services. You’re sending a message that people need to do certain things in order to have the pleasure of working with you.

One of my policies, is that I won’t share my price with a prospective client until I know they’ve got all of the information they need to properly make the right decision for themselves (which isn’t always to hire me). If I was to provide price first and allow a prospective client to make up their mind before they had enough information of what my service is about, then I’ve just done them a great dis-service (see Seth Godin’s post here for more info on this). The most effective way for me to provide them with that information, is to meet them in person. Face to face is my greatest method of communication.

I know many DJs insist on a meeting (consultation) ahead of sharing their price if they get the chance. I don’t leave that to chance. I require a face to face meeting with prospective clients before I’ll take them on.

Hiring my services is actually more work for wedding couples then if they would have simply hired the average DJ from down the street. That would in fact, be far easier for them. I’m not looking for couples who just want it easy.

The request, to have them to follow the path you’ve found to work best for your and your clients, needs to be carefully framed of course. This post isn’t about how to do that, but I will briefly provide an example from a recent interaction.

The following is from an email I sent off a few days ago. We’ve spoken once on the phone already, this was her reply, with mine following it. Will I let this prospective go if they aren’t available to meet me by one of the two methods I’ve suggested? Absolutely.

“Hi Dave,

I’m so sorry it’s taken me so long to get back to you! Unfortunately my fiancee and I are both back in Winnipeg for the school year, is there anyway to tell me about your rates and services via e-mail??

Thanks so much, BRIDE”

My reply to her:

“Hey BRIDE,

Thanks so much for getting back to me.  Really appreciate it!  We do need to meet, even if it’s just on Skype.  As odd as it sounds, I won’t actually consider taking on clients until we’ve had a chance to meet.  🙂  Just part of what I do.

Would you be available any evening to Skype?  Another option would also be that I’ll actually be in Winnipeg on Saturday, September 21st for a wedding that I’m working with.  I’ll be staying overnight in the city and could possibly meet with you the Sunday morning before I leave.  I’m awaiting confirmation on one other possible appointment that morning, but would that work for you?

Let me know, thanks BRIDE!  :-)”

This isn’t exactly playing “hard to get”. The delicate balance, if you can find it, is that setting up specific guidelines for working with you, can lead to increased desire on the part of prospective clients to hire your services. You’re sending a message that people need to do certain things in order to have the pleasure of working with you.

Written as originally posted to the CPDJA online Facebook group on September 11, 2013.

Are YOU as glossy as your marketing material?

You influence the public’s perception of your brand every moment, of every day, in so many ways it’s impossible to count. If you’re in business for yourself, who YOU are is tied to your brand as much as your glossy marketing materials. Are YOU as glossy as your marketing material?

When it comes to brand awareness for my company, Special Request Weddings, each and every little thing I do makes an impression on my company. Every time I come into contact with another human being, I add something to my companies brand. The really important question is, am I adding positive influences or negative influences to the publics perception of my brand?

I am adding to my brand all the time and everywhere regardless of:

– the time and day (morning, weekend, night, etc)
– the location (at the shopping mall, on Facebook, stepping outside to pick up the mail and deposit at the bank, etc.)
– the people involved in the interaction (friends, the person at the drive through, the builder adding on to my house, etc.)
– and many more…

My brand, because I work for myself, is ME. As trivial as it might be, as cosmetic as it might appear, as superficial as it might sound: I AM my brand.

I might polish my brand with a nice website, colourful and happy brochures, sleek business cards, etc. but all of that can be undone in an instant. It only takes a few negative influences added to your brand to undo a lengthy list of positive ones. This means that if I don’t realize that I AM my brand, I may be continually backtracking my way to that new level of desired success.

That sloppy looking fool buying cucumbers and tomatoes at the grocery store, yep, that’s adding to my brand. That guy in to much of a hurry at the drive through window who let’s his impatience get the best of him while paying for his burger, yep that’s adding to my brand. That person trying to haggle a better deal on the new sofa that his wife wants, yep, that’s adding to my brand.

You influence the public’s perception of your brand every moment, of every day, in so many ways it’s impossible to count. If you’re in business for yourself, who YOU are is tied to your brand as much as your glossy marketing materials. Are YOU as glossy as your marketing material?

~ Dave T.

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Written as originally posted to the CPDJA online Facebook group on September 9, 2013.

 

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All content is © Dave Ternier but sharing of blog content online (Facebook, chat groups, etc.) is strongly encouraged provided the following two conditions are met: 1) Direct URL to the blog post must be shared and any part of blog quoted must be attributed to Dave Ternier or aDJthought.com and 2) Copying and pasting an entire blog post in it’s entirety is not permissible, but if quoting, please quote no more then 1 – 2 paragraphs.

Treat the bride & groom’s guests as your own

Treat the bride & groom’s guests as your own. Talk to (your) guests. Step out of the “DJ” box for just a moment to be a host and friend.

Earlier this evening, we’d just finished honouring wedding guests Roy & Olga for their years of marriage. As the following song was playing, I went over to them, off mic, and shook their hands congratulating this Aunt & Uncle of the Bride personally. After some basic chatter, Roy told me about how when he was 16 or 17 (shortly after he’d broken up with an ex-girlfriend) he took Olga out to a dance. The first song they danced to that night was “Smoke Gets In Your Eyes” by the Platters.

I shared that story as way of introducing the song and then invited everyone to join Roy & Olga on the dance floor, to share in a dance that for them, started 52 years ago when they first met.

I’d have never been able to create that memory for them and the other guests if I didn’t take the time to treat them as my guests and go out of my way to talk with them. It was a really great moment that I’m sure they’ll remember from the night.

Treat the bride & groom’s guests as your own. Talk to (your) guests. Step out of the “DJ” box for just a moment to be a host and friend.

Written as originally posted to the CPDJA online Facebook group on August 25, 2013.

Be social, reach out

Be social. Reach out. Network. Be a great guy/gal to everyone you speak with.

A conversation I had with a wedding planner yesterday was propped up in a great way because of a name I shared of a fellow wedding professional out in Toronto. She knew of him. That prompted the conversation to move along really positively.

When they say it’s “who you know”, that can sometimes be true. Another interpretation to that statement though is, if you know “them” on some level or another then a person can assume certain things about you. This can be good or bad, depending on that person’s view of “them”.

As is also sometimes said, “If you want to be a millionaire, surround yourself with millionaires.” That statement too, has a lot more depth to it then it displays on the surface.

Be social. Reach out. Network. Be a great guy/gal. That’s my thought for the day.

Written as originally posted to the CPDJA online Facebook group on August 9, 2013.

Have backup gear

Have backup gear. Think outside of just speakers and lights. If weddings are a priority for you, what else might be considered backup gear?

The backup gear in this case was a small little piece of fabric. Typically, a piece of fabric worn on the leg of a bride during her wedding day.

After participation was requested of her guests for the garter removal & toss, the bride looked at me with horror as she realized the garter that she’d carefully selected and ordered from Etsy wasn’t actually on her leg as she’d thought. It was still at her Mom & Dad’s place in a dresser drawer.

Moments later… I discretely stuffed my backup garter into her hand and suggested she slip quickly into the kitchen and put it on. Two days later, she gave me the garter she’d ordered from Etsy with the suggestion that I keep it for the next bride who forgets hers. She also thanked me for making the moment happen without anyone else knowing what went on.

Have backup gear. Think outside of just speakers and lights. If weddings are a priority for you, what else might be considered backup gear?

Written as originally posted to the CPDJA online Facebook group on August 12, 2013.